Afrique Ameriques Asie Europe Moyen-Orient Internet
 
Tunisia17.11.2005

Robert Ménard prevented from attending the UN Internet summit, Reporters Without Borders activists stuck a giant poster inside the building hosting the WSIS

Tunisian police officers in plain clothes physically prevented Reporters Without Borders’ Secretary General from leaving the plane on which he arrived in Tunis. The organisation said it was outraged at this decision and staggered by the tacit complicity of the organisers of the WSIS and of France.

Reporters Without Borders said it was outraged after the Tunisian authorities turned back its Secretary General Robert Ménard on his arrival in Tunis to attend the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS).

Plain clothes Tunisian police officers physically prevented Ménard from leaving an Air France plane after it touched down in Tunis on 17 November 2005. One officer told the head of the worldwide press freedom organisation that he had no right to get off the plane since he did not have accreditation for the WSIS.

Reporters Without Borders said, “We are also staggered by the complicity of the organisers of the World Summit on the Information Society and to some extent, France, which did nothing to ensure his attendance at this international summit.

“From being a masquerade, the WSIS has turned into a scandal,” the organisation added.

As Ménard was prevented from leaving the plane, another police officer filmed the incident without permission from the Air France crew.

Ménard told police that it was untrue he did not have accreditation, his UN accreditation number was 10 30 191. He received no further explanation from police officers at the door of the plane and on the tarmac. The plane’s captain told him to stay on board and issued him with a return ticket on the same aircraft.

Robert Ménard was due to arrive back at Roissy CDG (Paris) at 14.20 on AF 1985.

No WSIS organiser nor any representative of the French embassy had been present to receive him in Tunis.

Executive director of the WSIS, Charles Geiger, had said in a statement on 16 November that Robert Ménard was not welcome at the summit, although his office had given him accreditation. He referred to a claim made by the Tunisian authorities that an official complaint had been laid against Ménard in Tunisia.

Geiger admitted that he had not confirmed the existence of the complaint. Moreover, the president of the Tunisian bar told Reporters Without Borders’s lawyer that he was unaware of any such complaint.

Reporters Without Borders activists on 17 November 2005 stuck a giant poster representing the “black holes in the web” inside the building hosting the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS).

Members of the organisation stuck a 2x3-metre poster on the floor of the exhibition pavilion among stands set up the countries taking part in the summit. It illustrated the 15 ‘enemies of the Internet’ - the countries that trample on free expression on the Net.

In these “black holes on the web”, sites are censored, draconian filtering systems set up and cyberdissidents and Internet-users harassed and imprisoned.