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What we do with our money


-  (JPEG) Reporters Without Borders provided funding on 10 April for the Chechen independent magazine Dosh, which covers current affairs in Chechnya and the five other republics in the Russian Caucasus. The magazine’s editors were forced to relocate from the Chechen capital of Grozny to Moscow for safety reasons but, despite threats and reprisals, have never stopped covering the region with the help of their correspondents in the field. Copies of the magazine in Russian and English are available at Reporters Without Borders headquarters in Paris.







-  Emergency funding was provided to a journalist and human rights activist in Guatemala on 7 April so that he could remain in the protected residence where he has been living with his wife and young children for the past six months. They were forced to leave their own home after he was threatened by gunmen. The fatal shooting of Telecentro news reporter Rolando Santis in Guatemala City on 1 April has highlighted the extent to which Guatemalan journalists are exposed to the dangers of violent crime.

-  Reporters Without Borders hosted a Congolese journalist from Bukavu, the capital of the poverty-stricken, violence-torn eastern province of Sud-Kivu, on his arrival in Paris on 28 March. He had been getting frequent anonymous threats and been forced to constantly adopt very inconvenient safety measures. After Radio Okapi journalist Didace Namujimbo’s murder in Bukavu last November, he had a expressed a desire to spend some time in a relatively calm, safe environment in order to write and to meet European journalists and politicians.

-  (JPEG) On 24 March, Reporters Without Borders helped a Mexican journalist who fled into exile after drug traffickers repeatedly threatened and harassed him and his family. He was given money and assistance with official paperwork. He had been covering the bloody war being waged by Mexico’s main drug cartels in Ciudad Juárez, a city on the US border, and organised crime infiltration into the local government.


-  Emergency funding of 1,000 US dollars was given on 19 March to a Burmese journalist who is under threat from the military government as a result of participating in demonstrations and conferences abroad. She has been relocated to a safe place and Reporters Without Borders is now trying to help her to resume working without jeopardising her safety.

-  An Afghan journalist who has been getting help from Reporters Without Borders for the past two years during a long odyssey from Kabul to Ankara finally arrived in Paris on a humanitarian visa on 9 March and was installed in the Residence for Journalists. He expressed relief to be in France and said he hoped to resume working as a journalist. He used to write for the monthly Haqoq-e-Zan (Women’s Rights) in Afghanistan, where he was constantly threatened by the religious authorities.

-  Reporters Without Borders agreed on 4 March to pay for a new lawyer to handle the appeal of Niger journalist Boussada Ben Ali, the editor of the Niamey-based independent weekly L’Action, who was sentenced on 6 February to three months in prison and a fine of 50,000 CFA francs (76 euros). His original lawyer is himself now being prosecuted on a charge of “discrediting a court decision” for publicly criticising his conviction. The local bar association has rallied to Ben Ali’s cause.

-  On 25 February, Reporters Without Borders bought computer equipment for the Jaffna-based newspaper Uthayan, one of the Tamil media that have been most hit by violence. Its employees are often intimidated and arrested and its headquarters have been the target of repeated attacks in an attempt to prevent it from continuing to operate. Of late, the Sri Lankan authorities have been criticising it for its reports about the civilian victims in the fighting in the northern Vanni area and for reprinting interviews that Tamil Tiger rebels have given to foreign news media.

-  Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance on 10 February to the families of journalists who have been jailed on trumped-up charges in the Azerbaijani capital of Baku for writing about abuse of authority and government corruption. The imprisonment of their bread-winners has left these families struggling to survive.

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-  Reporters Without Borders provided financial help on 5 February to an Ethiopian journalist who was threatened and arrested for being outspoken and critical of the government in his articles. Openly accused of opposition links, he fears his chances of being able to return home and live with his family are getting slimmer. The Reporters Without Borders funding enabled him to find accommodation.


-  (PNG) Reporters Without Borders is helping to fund the Myanmar Blog Academy Awards, which will be given annually to Burmese bloggers and cyber-journalists providing the best reporting on political, social, cultural or technological issues. The prize for winners is either a free domain name and webhosting for two years or 500 hours of free online time in Burmese Internet cafés. The aim of the awards is to help Burmese bloggers overcome a lack of visibility due to the military government’s censorship and to technical difficulties arising from the Burmese alphabet, which is poorly handled by current software.

-  During a visit to Afghanistan, from 10 to 16 january 2009, a Reporters Without Borders delegation met an Afghan journalist who has been pursued by the Taliban for several months. He had been working for several foreign media and had refused to put out information about Taliban leaders. As a result, he was branded as a “heathen” and was openly threatened with death. Reporters Without Borders helped him financially and has stayed in contact with him while he tries to find a safe refuge.

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Jean-François Julliard, secrétaire général de Reporters sans frontières et Fahim Dashty, représentant de l’UNJA

The Reporters Without Borders delegation visiting Afghanistan also gave bullet-proof vests to the Afghanistan Independent Journalists Association and the National Union of Afghan Journalists.












-  On 22 January, Reporters Without Borders awarded an emergency grant to an Eritrean journalist who fled to Sudan. In Eritrea, he had been summoned several times and threatened with being sent to join his many fellow journalists in prison after he wrote about the country’s disastrous water management policies. The movements of Eritrean refugees in Sudan, including journalists supported by Reporters Without Borders, are routinely monitored by Eritrean government agents with Sudanese complicity and sometimes they are forcibly repatriated and immediately jailed.


-  Reporters Without Borders provided funding on 21 January to the Chechen magazine Dosh, which covers current affairs and human rights in Chechnya and the five other republics of the Russian Caucasus. The magazine’s editors have been the target of threats and reprisals and, for safety reasons, have been forced to relocate from the Chechen capital of Grozny to Moscow but, thanks to their correspondents in the field, they have never stopped covering the region. Copies of recent issues of the magazine in Russian and English are available at Reporters Without Borders headquarters in Paris.





On 18 January, Reporters Without Borders helped a Congolese journalist who had been unfairly harassed and threatened by the National Intelligence Agency (ANR).

Reporters Without Borders has been looking after a Burmese journalist who arrived in Paris on 15 January with the aim of seeking political asylum. For more than 20 years, he had been based near the Burmese border in Thailand where he was under a constant threat of being deported back to Burma. Reporters Without Borders helped to persuade the French authorities to give him a visa to travel to France. It is expected that he will soon be able to resume his work as a journalist.

Emergency assistance was provided on 14 January to a Turkmen journalist who has been the target of constant harassment by the authorities for his persistence in providing the international community with coverage of what is happening in his country. The harassment has increased in recent weeks. Phone lines have been cut. He has been under constant surveillance. And he has had problems getting Internet access. Furthermore, some if his relatives have lost their jobs because of his activities and the family’s financial situation is extremely precarious.

-  Emergency assistance was provided on 8 January to a Zimbabwean journalist who is under threat from the authorities because of a TV report about prison conditions in Harare. Reporters Without Borders helped him and his family relocate to a safe place in a neighbouring country and obtain the documents they needed.

2008

-  Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance to the family of Radio Okapi reporter Didace Namujimbo, who was killed by a single shot to the head on 21 November in Bukavu, the capital of the eastern DRC province of Sud-Kivu.

-  On 10 December, Reporters Without Borders helped an Ethiopian journalist find accommodation in France, where he has requested asylum. Detained for several months in Ethiopia on a libel charge and then sought by the police because of his coverage of the 2005 elections, he was forced to live in hiding before fleeing the country.

-  A Bolivian journalist based in the provinces was given assistance on 6 December with relocating in another part of the country because of threats to his safety from a sector of the local population angered by his reporting.

-  Financial assistance was provided on 5 December to a young Congolese journalist who had been threatened with arrest following a controversial report. It enabled her to move to a neighbouring country and continue working there.

-  The editor of an outspoken newspaper in Kyrgyzstan that was closed by the authorities was helped by Reporters Without Borders on 24 November to relocate to a safe place with her young children.

-  In November, Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance for lobbying for the release of Lewis Medjo, the publisher of the privately-owned weekly La Détente Libre, who has been held in pre-trial detention since 22 September on a charge of publishing false information. His case has been repeatedly postponed.

-  Reporters Without Borders brought a Pakistani journalist to France on 17 November. He was held incommunicado and subjected to physical and psychological torture for near two years until his release. He was granted visas by the French authorities and he will receive help from Reporters Without Borders and the Residence for Journalists in Paris while going though the asylum procedure.

-  An Iranian journalist who was forced to go into exile after being openly threatened with reprisals if did not stop criticising the government in his articles was given 400 euros on 9 November to help him find accommodation in Switzerland, where he has requested asylum.

-  Financial assistance was provided on 7 November to a young Eritrean journalist to help meet his day-to-day needs in the United States, where he has decided to apply for asylum. He reached the United States via Sudan and Ethiopia after fleeing in 2007 from Eritrea, where he was detained arbitrarily several times and where he is now regarded as a “traitor” and “fugitive.”

-  Reporters Without Borders helped a journalist in Nord-Kivu, in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, to move to a safe place away from the current area of fighting on 7 November.

-  On 3 November, Reporters Without Borders financed the medical evacuation of three Somali journalists who were injured when a car-bomb exploded outside the Ethiopian embassy in the northern breakaway territory of Somaliland. They are receiving treatement for their injuries in an appropriately-equipped hospital abroad.

-  Reporters Without Borders contributed on 29 October towards the cost of registering and organising a concert on 13 December 2008 to mark the 10th anniversary of the murders of Norbert Zongo, the editor of the Ouagadougou-based newspaper L’Indépendant, and three companions.

-  On 19 September, Reporters Without Borders helped an Iraqi refugee journalist family move into new accommodation in Europe. The journalists had received death threats in Iraq for working for foreign news media.

-  Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance on 16 September to two journalists - a Mauritanian and a Cuban - who have been granted protection by the French government. Now with refugee status, they are actively seeking work or training.

-  On 11 September, Reporters Without Borders helped a Sri Lankan journalist locate his family, from whom he had been separated for more than three years.

-  A grant of 600 euros was paid on 10 September to an Ethiopian journalist who was forced to flee his country because he had been threatened. He is not in a position to travel and is extremely short of money.

-  A grant of 1,000 euros was paid on 3 September to the Deyda Hydara Foundation, which helps to protect and defend Gambian journalists. It is named after Deyda Hydara, the editor of the privately-owned newspaper The Point and Banjul correspondent of Agence France-Presse and Reporters Without Borders, who was murdered on 16 December 2004.

-  Reporters Without Borders gave 1,500 euros on 16 August to the families of two Georgian journalists - Giga Chikhladze and Alexander Klimchuk - who were shot dead while covering the arrival of Georgian forces in the breakaway province of South Ossetia on 8 August. The money was to help cover the cost of returning the bodies and other expenses incurred by the grieving families.

-  A Russian journalist who was forced to leave her country after being threatened over articles regarded by the authorities as “extremist” was given 600 euros on 13 August. Reporters Without Borders is providing financial help to Azerbaijani journalist Agil Khalil, who arrived in France at the end of July. He had been the target of several physical attacks and murder attempts since February in connection with articles he wrote for the opposition daily Azadlyg about corruption involving members of the national security service.

-  A Bangladeshi cartoonist who is no longer able to find work was given 700 euros on 1 August to compensate for his loss of income. He was detained for six months and accused of “offending the public’s religious sentiments” as a result of a cartoon published in the satirical newspaper Aalpin.

-  Jamila Kaka, the wife of Reporters Without Borders Niger correspondent Moussa Kaka, who has been detained for the last 10 months in Niamey, was paid 1,000 euros on 31 July. The organisation would have paid Kaka a similar amount for his reports if he had been able to work.

-  Reporters Without Borders approved a financial grant on 24 July for a Tanzanian journalist who had been living and working in Rwanda and who was suddenly repatriated by force in the middle of the night and no longer has any source of income.

-  Reporters Without Borders gave Colombian journalist Pedro Cardenas 600 euros on 28 July. Cardenas had been threatened several times by members of the paramilitary alliance known as the United Self-Defence Groups of Colombia (AUC) and was attacked on 14 July after his newspaper published the names of four people who were arrested in early June on suspicion of paramilitary links.

-  Urgent financial assistance was approved on 4 June for journalists and their families who were hit by Cyclone Nargis, which devastated parts of Burma and caused the deaths of at least 22,000 people on 2 and 3 May. The Burma Media Association has identified 82 families of journalists, writers and media workers that suffered as a result of the disaster. The BMA is continuing to raise funds on its website.

-  Reporters Without Borders decided on 2 June to provide financial assistance to three Somali journalists employed by Mogadishu-based Radio Shabelle who fled the country after the murder of the station’s owner, Bashir Nur Gedi, in October 2007 and the station’s arbitrary closure by the security forces the following month. The three journalists are now based in safe location outside Somalia and will be able to buy equipment in order to resume working.

-  The organisation helped to pay the legal fees of imprisoned Afghan journalist Sayed Perwiz Kambakhsh, who was sentenced to death on a blasphemy charge by a court in the northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif. His lawyer has appealed against the verdict and sentence.

-  On 26 May, Reporters Without Borders helped a Malian journalist and former winner of the RFI-Reporters Without Borders prize to get medical treatment.

-  A lump sum was paid on 16 May to an Iraqi journalist who has found refugee in France to enable him to visit his family, from whom he had been separated for three years.

-  On 13 May, Reporters Without Borders helped Bisharo Mohammed Waeys, a Somali TV journalist based in Bosaso, in the semi-autonomous northeastern region of Puntland, move to a safe location after she was the target of a murder attempt. A presenter for Eastern Television Network, a Bosaso-based TV station, she came under fire from several gunmen while driving in her car. She also received several threatening SMS messages.

-  An Ethiopian journalist who fled to Sudan more than two years ago was given help with resettling in a safe place where he will be able to file an asylum request. After being held for several months on a defamation charge in Ethiopia, he was sought by the police because of his articles about the 2005 elections. He went into hiding and then fled Ethiopia on foot, taking eight months to reach Khartoum.

-  Reporters Without Borders helped to pay the costs of a conference on 2-3 May in Rabat on press freedom in the Maghreb, transferring 2,000 euros to the Working Group on Press Freedom and Free Expression (WGFENA), which organised the event.

-  Reporters Without Borders provided funds to a Cuban journalist in Madrid to help her find accommodation. Her critical reporting for US-based radio stations had incurred the regime’s wrath and she requested asylum after managing to travel to Spain. It could take as long as two years for her request to be processed and in the meantime she has little or no money on which to survive.

-  Financial assistance was provided on 23 April to a freelance European journalist based in Thailand who was in difficulty.

-  A Chinese journalist who contributes to the overseas Chinese website Boxun was given 1,000 euros so that he could pay his lawyer’s fees. He had been arrested on charges of “illegal possession of weapons” and “disturbing the peace” because he refused to stop writing and sending reports to Boxun.

-  Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance on 21 April to an Eritrean journalist who has fled to Ethiopia and is now in a refugee camp waiting to be resettled in a third country.-On 20 April, Reporters Without Borders provided financial aid to an Iranian journalist who fled his country after being arrested.

-  On 9 April, Reporters Without Borders paid the Syrian hospital fees of an Iraqi journalist with internal bleeding. She had to be treated in a private clinic in a Damascus suburb because the public hospitals refuse to treat Iraqis with no residence permit. A few days before that, Reporters Without Borders helped pay the hospital fees of an Iraqi journalist now living in Jordan.

-  On 2 April, two grants of financial aid were made to Eritrean journalists in Sudan so that they could find refuge in a safe place. They had been threatened in Asmara because of their views and were forced to flee to Khartoum. But they continued to be under threat there from Eritrean intelligence services operating in Sudan. The Sudanese Refugees Commission had asked them to go to Wad Sherif, a refugee camp in Kassala, which is near the Eritrean border and very dangerous. More than 40 refugees have been kidnapped there and sent back to Asmara.

-  On 27 March, Reporters Without Borders donated 1,200 euros to help pay for the publication in N’Djamena of a “Newspaper of Newspapers,” a one-off issue combining most of Chad’s independent weeklies. Put together by journalists from six media that are currently not operating (N’Djamena Hebdo, Le Temps, Notre Temps, l’Observateur, Le Miroir and radio FM-Liberté), the 12-page issue had a print run of 10,000 copies and sold for 200 CFA francs. It included a plea for press freedom in Chad, and in particular, for the repeal of a press law adopted by decree on 20 February while a state of emergency was in force.

-  On 26 March, Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance to a Congolese journalist, managing editor of the weekly L’Aurore, who fled to the Ugandan capital of Kampala in 2004 after being harassed by a militia in Bukavu, in the east of Democratic Republic of Congo. He and his family have been awaiting resettlement in Canada for several years and are having to survive on very little money.

-  On 20 March, Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance to a Tamil journalist who has been forced to seek refuge in Europe. His reporting on human rights violations and political issues in Sri Lanka led to his being abducted by paramilitaries. Released as a result of international pressure, he was later openly threatened in Colombo, where several journalists have been the target of murder attempts since the end of 2007.

-  On 12 March, Reporters Without Borders helped pay for the N’Djamena Bi-Hebdo publisher to find refuge in a safe place. He fled the Chadian capital of N’Djamena as the security forces made several attempts to arrest journalists during a rebel offensive against the city. A state of emergency was proclaimed after the fighting was over and the capital’s privately-owned newspapers suspended publication in protest against the creation of a censorship committee.

-  On 7 March, Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance to an Iraqi Shiite journalist in dire straits in the Syrian capital of Damascus, where he is awaiting a response to his application to the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees for protection. A contributor to various Iraqi media such as Al-Sabah, Al-Mada and Al-Karara, he fled Baghdad after a bomb attack on his home. In August 2006, he was kidnapped by gunmen who he believes were members of the Mahdi Army.

-  On 27 February, Reporters Without Borders helped to pay the fees of Central African Republic journalist Faustin Bambou’s lawyer. The editor of Les Collines de l’Oubangui, Bambou was sentenced to six months in prison on 28 January on charges of libel, insult and “incitement to revolt” in an article claiming that two government ministers received several billion CFA francs in commissions from the French company Areva. He was freed on 23 February after being pardoned by President François Bozizé. The funds provided by Reporters Without Borders are also meant to help relaunch the newspaper.

-  On 25 February, Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance to a Guinean journalist who fled to Senegal with his family more than a year ago after being accused of insulting the Guinean president and military in his articles. It will help to pay for the three children’s schooling. The journalist and his family are waiting to be resettled in a third country and in the meantime their financial situation is extremely precarious. Before leaving Guinea, he was kidnapped and badly beaten by four men in plain clothes armed with automatic rifles, who left him for dead at a rubbish dump on the outskirts of Conakry. When he tried to report the attack to the authorities, three armed man went to this home and threatened his wife. It was then that he decided they had to flee.

-  On 20 February, Reporters Without Borders helped an exiled Gambian journalist to be housed in a safe place. He has been threatened several times because of articles that were very critical of the government. He had been subject to constant surveillance following his arrest in June 2006 and was forced to leave Gambia after soldiers came to his home.

-  On 7 February, Reporters Without Borders contributed to the hospitalisation costs of a Somali journalist who had to be sent to Dubai for an operation. He was rushed to hospital with serious injuries on 11 January after two masked gunmen attacked and beat him in Gaalkacyo as he returned home on completing his shift at the radio station where he works.

-  On 6 February, Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance to a Chadian journalist who ended up in a refugee camp in Cameroon with no money after an abortive rebel assault on N’Djamena at the start of the month. He narrow escaped arrest by two men in uniforms and turbans and riding a motorcycle who went to his N’Djamena home and asked the children there to say where he was. They were suspected of being intelligence agents. He fled the Chadian capital across the border into Cameroon as soon as the fighting was over.

-  On 5 February, Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance to the family of a Tunisian journalist who was arrested during an identity check on 26 November and was given a one-year jail sentence on 4 December for “insulting an official in the exercise of his duties.” Reporters Without Borders has been campaigning for the release of the journalist, who is the victim of judicial persecution.

-  On 28 January, Reporters Without Borders paid the travel expenses of a Russian journalist who had to flee the Caucasian republic of Dagestan in a hurry. As a result of writing about the kidnapping of civilians in Dagestan and the failure of the authorities to taken any action, she felt threatened by officials in the city of Khasavyurt and feared for her safety, especially after getting a summons from the police.

-  Reporters Without Borders made a financial grant on 21 January to Lucie Umukundwa, a Rwandan journalist living in exile in France, to help her pay for two children’s schooling.

-  On 11 January, Reporters Without Borders helped to pay the costs of installing a Gambian journalist in a nearby country after he fled Gambia, leaving his family behind, because he was being threatened by his government. He had been arrested and tortured several times.

-  Reporters Without Borders provided financial aid on 2 January to a Paraguayan journalist living in exile whose family has been threatened.

2007

-  Reporters Without Borders gave 600 euros on 28 December to an Iraqi journalist and writer to help pay for her installation costs in France, where she had been granted refugee status.
-  Reporters Without Borders gave an exiled Rwandan journalist financial assistance on 20 December
-  Reporters Without Borders helped a Bangladeshi journalist to pay his lawyer’s fees on 29 November.
-  Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance to the family of journalist Norbert Zongo on 27 November to help mark the 9th anniversary of his murder.
-  On 21 November, Reporters Without Borders paid for the travel and living expenses of an Eritrean journalist who has sought refuge in a neighbouring country.
-  Reporters Without Borders provided urgent financial assistance on 30 October to four Somali journalists who had fled the capital, Mogadishu, because of an increasing climate of violence towards journalists.
-  On 18 October, Reporters Without Borders paid for the creation of a banner proclaiming solidarity with imprisoned journalist Moussa Kaka for a press freedom demonstration organised two days later in Niamey by the Network of Journalists for Human Rights (RJDH).
-  In October, Reporters Without Borders helped a Burmese journalist who had been forced to hide in Rangoon after covering the pro-democracy demonstrations.
-  On 2 October, Reporters Without Borders helped the families of two imprisoned Iranian journalists.
-  On 31 August, Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance to an Iraqi journalist who fled from Baghdad and sought refuge in Souleimaniya, in the northern Kurdish region.
-  On 26 July, Reporters Without Borders provided financial support for the Tamil daily newspaper Uthayan, four of whose employees have been killed by paramilitaries or the security forces. The same day, the organisation provided financial assistance for the family of Subramaniam Ramachandran, the correspondent of the daily Yarl Thinakural, who has been missing since 15 February.
-  On 6 July, Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance to an Ethiopian journalist living in exile in Kenya.
-  Reporters Without Borders and Chti, the guide to the French city of Lille, provided financial support that enabled the independent Afghan newspaper Kabul Weekly to resume publishing for the first time in six months.
-  On 26 April, Reporters Without Borders provided financial aid to two Kurdish journalists who were seriously injured in a bombing in 2004.
-  On 12 April, Reporters Without Borders helped pay the legals fees of a Rwandan journalist.
-  On 11 April, Reporters Without Borders gave financial help to an exiled Eritrean journalist.
-  On 6 April, Reporters Without Borders awarded a financial grant to an Iraqi woman journalist who fled to the northern Kurdish region after a relative was kidnapped and tortured.
-  Between 2 and 6 April, a Reporters Without Borders delegation in Iraq granted financial assistance to the families of 20 journalists who have been murdered. The financing came from a fund that was created on 20 March 2006 for the relatives of journalists killed in Iraq who worked for news media with limited financial resources.
-  On 9 March, Reporters Without Borders helped to pay the legal fees of two Chinese cyberdissidents in prison.
-  On 6 February, Reporters Without Borders helped to pay the legal fees of a journalist in Sierra Leone so that he could obtain his release.
-  On 6 February, Reporters Without Borders granted financial assistance to an Ivorian journalist.
-  On 18 January, Reporters Without Borders helped pay the legal fees of a Rwandan journalist who has been detained.

2006

-  On 18 December, Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance to an Eritrean journalist in exile.
-  On 5 December, Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance for the organisation of a seminar in Peshawar, Pakistan to mark the first anniversary of the kidnapping of the journalist Hayatullah Khan. The event was held with its partner organisation the Tribal Union of Journalists.
-  On 30 November, Reporters Without Borders funded the organization by the Collectif Norbert Zongo of the 8th anniversary of the assassination of the Burkinabe journalist.
-  On 30 November, Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance to Iwacu newspaper, for the purchase of computer equipment, in order to relaunch Burundese private press.
-  On 15 November, Reporters Without Borders sent the equivalent of three months in assistance to the families of six imprisoned Burmese journalists. It also bought advertising space to support Oodan, a magazine published by the Burma Media Association.
-  On 10 November, Reporters Without Borders provided assistance to a key witness of journalist Edgar Damalerio’s murder. Despite death threats, he agreed to testify at the trial and as a result, the killer was convicted.
-  Reporters Without Borders provided financial assistance on 12 October to the widow of a murdered Sri Lankan journalist.
-  22 September Financial assistance provided to a threatened journalist in Sri Lanka.
-  28 August - Reporters without borders helped a Congolese journalist forced to hide in a neighbouring country for several of weeks, along with his family.
-  11 August - Financial assistance provided to a Rwandese journalist fleeing out of his country.
-  Reporters Without Borders contributed on 12 July to the cost of organising a conference on the "Security of Journalists in the Tribal Areas" that took place in Islamabad, Pakistan. Held at the initiative of the Tribal Union of Journalists (TUJ), a Reporters Without Borders partner organisation, it enabled the union to get its message across to parliamentarians, journalists and other persons of influence in the Pakistani capital.
-  30 June - Reporters without borders transferred a sum corresponding to a month of salary to a Burundese journalist enjailed.
-  Together with the UN and the NGO Journalist in Danger (JED), Reporters Without Borders helped organise the transfer of a Congolese journalist on 23 June from the town of Mbuji Mayi, where he had been violently attacked during a demonstration, to Kinshasa for a medical examination using a scanner. The cost of his lodging in Kinshasa was also covered.
-  Financial aid was sent to the Sierra Leone Association of Journalists on 9 June to pay for the ink needed to print Freetown newspapers for several months. Similar assistance was sent in 2005 for the purchase of newsprint.
-  6 June - Helped Indonesian journalists injured in the recent earthquake.
-  17 May - Paid medical bills for a Tunisian journalist on hunger-strike for several weeks.
-  Early May - Helped our partner organisation in Somalia give greater protection to its staff amid renewed fighting in the country.
-  6 April - Donation to a fund in the Philippines paying legal fees for the family of journalist Marlene Esperat, murdered in 2004.




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2005 progress Report
I. The state of press freedom worldwide in 2007
II. The year 2006
III. Reporters Without Borders’ field of work
IV. How to help us

Accounts 2006
Income and expenditure
State of accounts at 31 December 2006